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Werewolf Ninja Philosopher at Vimeo VOD

Recent Black & White Films - Trailers - Frances Ha, The Woman Who Left, Lover for a Day, Season Of The Devil, Roma, Werewolf Ninja Philosopher, Cold War

Black and white films are making a very slow comeback.  I chose black and white for my film Werewolf Ninja Philosopher.  Inspired in part by Frances Ha (2012) - and even earlier films Stranger Than Paradise (1984) and Down By Law (1986).  Here are several excellent recent films that have used black and white cinematography.

- Sujewa

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Frances Ha (2012)



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The Woman Who Left (2016)



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Lover for a Day (2017)


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Season Of The Devil (2018)



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Roma (2018)


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Werewolf Ninja Philosopher (2018)

Werewolf Ninja Philosopher 2018 trailer from Sujewa Ekanayake on Vimeo.

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Cold War (2018)




Recent posts

Film Threat's review of Werewolf Ninja Philosopher

Check it out at Film Threat.


From the review: "The script by director Sujewa Ekanayake works well, especially if one knows noir tropes very well. The gag about (almost) every woman who Werewolf encounters trying to get to know him better is a fun play on the sexually charged banter that infuses the most famous hardboiled detective stories. I for one found the idea of a Celebrity Crimes Unit existing to be hysterical and happily, the punchline is not overused." Read the rest here.

The way of the werewolf detective - a philosophy professor on Werewolf Ninja Philosopher

By eric anthamatten

@eAnthamatten on Twitter

The werewolf exists somewhere between man and wolf. The ninja exists somewhere between the light and the shadows. The philosopher exists somewhere between the lie and the truth. In this liminal intersection, a werewolf that is a ninja that is a philosopher searches for a serial killer, a sadistic murderer who targets art filmmakers.
Like its title, Werewolf Ninja Philosopher (2018) is a hybrid of hybrids, part noir mystery, part absurdist comedy, part cinephile fetish.
The name alone is enough to conjure a whole interesting set of possible stories and worlds, and like a good philosophy text, WWNP invokes a series of questions: How did the werewolf get to Brooklyn? Why is he here? Where is he going? Is he as ancient as the philosophers he studies? Did he walk alongside Aristotle? Did he train under Musashi? Was he once an assassin? Who did he kill? Did he kill? Will he kill again? Why is he trying to stop the killing?
Homo homini lupus. Man is…